Will Writing eventually be a Lost Cause?

 

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With technology ramping up everyday our culture is alternating into a universal world in which everything is fast paced and our lives are at the tips of our fingers. Most people are looking at this with wide eyes and an innovative perspective. It seems like everyday there is always an app I have yet to explore because new apps are always on the rise. But who is looking at the downside? There are pros and cons to everything, and I personally think that this technological world has a major con. With technological advances being the focal point of today’s society it’s concerning that the written word has a potential to fade away.

Something as simple as a handwritten letter is praised because its far more personal compared to writing an email or text that takes less than a minute. But, people want their information as soon as possible and if they can minimize their time doing that then they can use the time they saved to spend on something else. In a sense this lifestyle is making us super efficient, but its also making us less personal. Online we are all the same. When we are staring at our smartphone screens instead of observing the world around us we are missing out.

I remember how I was taught cursive in elementary school in the second grade and how I never ended up writing in cursive except for on the SATs and for my signature because writing ‘normally’ was easier and quicker (efficiency). Now I can barely read cursive without having to pause at each letter. Cursive was weeded out by simpler writing, so why can’t writing be weeded out by simple typing?

I don’t want writing to disappear. I think writing is unique because everybody technically has their own style and I think it’s interesting to see how one person writes completely different compared to another; it’s funny because often times only the writer can read his or her own hand writing. What’s interesting is that in some cultures writing is considered to be a separate language, for instance mandarin is split up into a written language and an oral language.

But, with technology being so prominent in today’s society it’s hard to predict what is going to happen to the written word. Half of the people in my classes don’t even handwrite notes anymore they just type them all down on their laptops. Teachers are also picking up on this trend of efficiency and beginning to put tests and quizzes online and no writing is involved whatsoever. Where is society taking us and is there a light at the end of the tunnel? Does the tunnel even end?

 

 

 

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One thought on “Will Writing eventually be a Lost Cause?”

  1. Hi, I found this post really interesting because I have wondered about this before. I can relate your experience with cursive I never understood why I had to learn it and I rarely use it. Also, I agree that handwritten notes are more personal. They come across as having more effort love and care put into them than a typed note that says the same things. You talked about note taking and handwriting in your post and how often people can only read their own handwriting and take notes on the computer. I find that I do not process lectures as well if I type my notes. I need to see them in my own handwriting which pretty much only I can read. I found an article on a psychology website that explains how typing notes causes students to retain facts as well as handwritten notes, but they are more likely to be unable to understand concepts from their typed notes. I think this is because handwritten is spaced and formatted exactly the way you think instead of organized the way a computer works. I hope the written word does not fade away because in our new faster paced world, I feel like people often bypass real understanding for the faster more efficient alternative. If interested, here is the link to the article I read.
    http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/take-notes-by-hand-for-better-long-term-comprehension.html

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