McDonaldization

 

American sociologist George Ritzer posits that such experiences are the result of “McDonaldization,” or the application of the principles of the fast food industry to other industries and sectors of postmodern society. McDonaldization affects not only the food industry (or amusement parks) but can be seen reflected in the standardization of many of the venues. Businesses such as big-box stores, shopping malls, cruise ships, and sports stadiums are common examples of enterprises that have been McDonaldized to make them highly rational organizations that offer workers low pay and customers ease, convenience, consistency, and familiarity. For example, although the stores may differ from venue to venue, one can walk into most shopping malls today and expect to see the area anchored by two or more major department stores (which themselves are McDonaldized so that a customer familiar with one store can easily find the same goods in the same location in another store), linked by smaller stores selling specialty goods (most of which are also McDonaldized replicas of other branches or franchises across the country), and a somewhat centralized food court (that serves the same food in all their branches so that customers can eat the same familiar hamburger, pita wrap, or French fries whether they are in Providence, Rhode Island; San Diego, California; or Chicago, Illinois. However, McDonaldization goes far beyond this supposedly comforting sameness of familiar retail organizations and has been extended by some theorists to include the American educational system, the travel industry, health care, and politics, among other social organizations.

Reference: Yeganeh, Hamid. “The McDonaldization of Society by G. Ritzer – Anglo Higher® Publishes News, Commentary and Opinion About Global Higher Education, Lifelong Learning and Professional Training.” The McDonaldization of Society by G. Ritzer – Anglo Higher® Publishes News, Commentary and Opinion About Global Higher Education, Lifelong Learning and Professional Training. N.p., 19 Apr. 2011. Web. 01 May 2016.

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