Funding Public Education

The education system within the United States has had its ups and downs but recently, the education system, particularly with public schools, have hit some lows. In Detroit, public schools will run out of money by June and will no longer have money to pay teachers. This led to protest by Detroit teachers that closed most of the schools in Detroit. Kansas also faces the same problem. The Kansas Supreme Court urged the lawmakers to put more money into public schools, particularly poor schools in low income neighborhoods. The United States has big gap between public schools in low income neighborhoods and public schools in middle/high income neighborhoods that many states have been trying to address. The education system now definitely needs some readjustment in order to create a system where kids are able to get equal opportunity and the fact that 2 states are considering closing down public schools shows the importance of this issue. If public schools were to close, the main source of education will be private schools that most low income families cannot afford to pay.

The effect of losing public schools is significant, but what is the cause of these problems within our education system. Has the education system always been struggling with funding and when did this problem occur if it wasn’t always like this? The education system has not always had a problem with funding. In the 18th and 19th century, public schools in states such as Pennsylvania used to offer free public school that was paid for by the wealthy. Public schools eventually received funding from local property taxes instead of from the wealthy. So, low income neighborhoods won’t be able to contribute that much for education compared to middle/high income neighborhoods. So, poor neighborhoods receive a poor education system and lose opportunities to possibly earn more money. This leads to school segregation of districts and large differences between two public schools.

Sources:

https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/education/report/2015/05/18/113397/a-fresh-look-at-school-funding/

http://www.npr.org/2016/05/01/476224759/is-there-a-better-way-to-pay-for-americas-schools

http://www.npr.org/2016/05/02/476498722/teachers-shut-down-nearly-all-detroit-public-schools-in-sick-out-protest

https://www.raceforward.org/research/reports/historical-timeline-public-education-us

 

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1 thought on “Funding Public Education”

  1. I really liked your article. I’ve never really focused on education inequality, but it is definitely a prominent and relevant issue today. It sucks that teachers get paid so inefficiently because they are the ones making a difference and prepping our generations to come for the world. While professional athletes and actors are getting paid millions of dollars of year for pure entertainment. On another note, with the presidential campaign in progress right now, one of the candidates, Bernie Sanders, has focused part of his campaign on college education. He wants to make college significantly cheaper and even make public colleges free of tuition. But, how can he do that if we our nation cannot even afford to fund public high school teachers?

    Like

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